Category Archive: research

Australians like vaccination, and overwhelmingly think it should be mandatory

Mass childhood vaccination is one of the most important public health measures ever devised. As well as protecting vaccinated individuals, high levels of overall vaccination also protect those who can’t be vaccinated themselves.… Continue reading

Evidence from Australia: women are under-represented in senior political appointments, and this affects the representation of women in parliament

Political advisers can help shape public policy. They are also often the politicians of the future, so it matters who they are. Using Australian Ministerial directories,  Marija Taflaga and Matthew Kerby tracked men… Continue reading

Campaign finance in Australia: What are the issues and how are they perceived by citizens?

Australians increasingly feel estranged from their representatives. According to the Australian Election Study, record numbers of Australians are concerned that the government is run not for them but for ‘a few big interests’?… Continue reading

Post-democracy: does populism have a place in Britain?

For democracy to be flourishing, movements emerging from the population must, from time to time, be able to give the system a shock, writes Colin Crouch. Yet that raises questions about xenophobic populism: can… Continue reading

Economic voting and party positions: when and how wealth matters for the vote

  Does the ownership of economic assets matter for how people vote? Drawing on new research, Timothy Hellwig and Ian McAllister find the answer is yes. They argue that by changing their policy positions, parties can shape the… Continue reading

Political consumerism: buying better to free slaves?

  Modern slavery is hard to define and quantify, with public understandings of the problem often built through stories presented in news, government reports, awareness campaigns, and entertainment media. The political narrative of… Continue reading

The end of the old order? From left-right to open-closed politics

Jonathan Wheatley explains the shifting positions of voters on economic matters and matters of culture. He writes that between 2015 and 2017 support for Britain’s main parties became much more predicated on issues of… Continue reading

Policy competition between the Greens and the Australian Labor Party

How do the Australian Greens and the Labor Party each use policies to appeal to voters? Do the Labor and Liberal parties adopt broadly similar policy positions? Are the Greens just ‘tree tories’?… Continue reading

Growth in online petitioning in Australia: The case of Change.org

Australians are enthusiastic online petitioners, certainly more enthusiastic than the Australian Government. Despite the fact that online petitioning is increasingly common, our government’s online petition site does not approach the standard set by… Continue reading

What is in a click?

Every year I ask my new crop of students the same thing: ‘Is clicking “Like” on Facebook political participation’? This is inevitably unpacked by way of a series of ‘yes’, ‘no’ and ‘maybe… Continue reading